Holy Basil
Last edited 01/22/2020 09:17:00 PM by Anthony Russano (anthony@qualitywebsolutions.org)


Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum syn Ocimum sanctum) is also known as tulsi or tulasi. The plant is used as a tea and for its essential oils.[1]

Composition

Eugenol, rosmarinic acid, carvacrol, oleanolic acid.[2]

Synergistic Properties

Can be combined with other cerebral stimulants such as rosemary, bacopa, and ginkgo biloba.

Healing Properties

Adaptogen

Analgesic

Pain relief

Antimicrobial

Antifungal

Antiviral (anti-viral)

Antioxidant

Antispasmodic

Brain Health

Attention

Tulsi treatment was shown to significantly improve willingness of adjustment and attention in humans.[3]

Behavior

Tulsi has potential actions in the regulation of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenocortical axis (HHA axis) especially, during stress related disorders in humans.[3]

Cerebral Stimulant

Neuroprotective

Cardiovascular Health

Antilipemic (Lowers Cholesterol)

Promotes a healthy lipid profile.

Digestive Aid

Expectorant

Immunomodulator

Oral Health

Irrigation with Tulsi extract has beneficial effect on plaque control and gingival health and is at par with the gold standard of chlorhexidine.[4]

Relaxing (calms nerves)

Disease & Symptom Treatment

Allergic rhinitis

Anxiety

Tulsi has good efficacy to negate anxiety related disorders in human subjects.[3]

Tulsi may be a promising anxiolytic agent and a safer alternative to Benzodiazepines for the therapy of stress related clinical disorders.[3]

  • Tulsi significantly attenuated generalized anxiety disorders and also attenuated its correlated stress and depression.
    • It significantly improved attention and the willingness to adjustment.

Colds and flu

Depression

Depression index was also reduced after two-months of continuous treatment with Tulsi (O. sanctum).[3]

Tulsi treatment significantly improved the willingness of adjustment and attention in human subjects.[3]

Diabetes

Insulin resistance

Gingivitis

Irrigation with Tulsi extract has beneficial effect on plaque control and gingival health and is at par with the gold standard of chlorhexidine.[4]

Fungal Infections

Head Trauma

Holy Basil may help speed up recovery from head trauma.[1]

Cardiovascular Disease

Atherosclerosis

High Blood Pressure

High Cholesterol (Hyperlipidemia, Hypercholesterolemia)

The content of polyphenol compounds such as flavonoids and tannins in basil leaves can reduce total cholesterol levels and inhibit fat oxidation which is the cause of atherosclerosis.[5]

Hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Tulsi treatment significantly improved the willingness of adjustment and attention in human subjects.[3]

Pain

Stress

Tulsi (O. sanctum) has significant anti-stress and anxiolytic properties.[3]

Tulsi extract showed overall improvement in stress management.[3]

Two-months of regular administration with O. sanctum reduced stress, attenuated anxiety, negated depression and enhanced adjustment and attention in human subjects.[3]

  • These observations clearly indicate that O. sanctum has potential action in the regulation of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenocortical axis (HHA axis) especially, during stress related disorders in human.[3]

Ulcers

Viral Infections

Herpes virus

Sources:

  1. Forêt, Rosalee de la. Alchemy of Herbs: Transform Everyday Ingredients into Foods and Remedies That Heal. Hay House, Inc., 2017. Citations:

  2. Study Type: Review
    Title: A review of medicinal and aromatic plants and their secondary metabolites status under abiotic stress
    Author(s): Andleeb Zehra, Sadaf Choudhary, M Naeem, M Masroor A, Khan and Tariq Aftab
    Institution(s): Plant Physiology Section, Department of Botany, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India
    Publication: Journal of Medicinal Plants Studies
    Date: April 2019
    Abstract: In developing countries, aromatic and medicinal plants are still used in traditional and alternative medicines. In India, medicinal plants are used in traditional medicine to cure various ailments. In the past decades, several studies highlighted the therapeutic properties and biological activities of medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs). These MAPs include Andrographis paniculata, Artemisia annua, Allium cepa, Allium sativum, Cymbopogon flexuosus, Ferula asafoetida, Foeniculum vulgare, Mentha piperita, Ocimum sanctum, Piper nigrum, Solanum nigrum, Tagetes minuta and Trigonella foenum-graecum. The MAPs contain bioactive secondary metabolites like alkaloids, flavonoids, steroids, terpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes, phenolics and saponins. These secondary metabolites possess antimalarial, anthelminthic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antiartheritic, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anticancer, antifungal, antispasmodic, cardio protective, ant thyroids and antihistaminic properties. These MAPs are also used in Indian traditional medicine for cure of several diseases like diarrhoea, indigestion, pains, congestion, coughs, sinusitis, fever, flu, sore throats, chills, sickness, rheumatism, sprains and muscular pains. Apart from the pharmaceutical industries, MAPs also have significance in industries related to perfumery, cosmetic, liquor and nutrition. Secondary metabolites play a major role in the adaptation of plants to the changing environment and stress condition. Secondary metabolites in plants are affected by both biotic and abiotic stress. High levels of stress in medicinal and aromatic plants can affect the secondary metabolite production. Abiotic (cold, heat, drought, salinity) stress leads to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cellular compartments of plant cell. Here we provide a review of the effect of abiotic stress on secondary metabolites of different medicinal and aromatic plants.
    Link: Source
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  3. Study Type: Human Study, Clinical Case Report
    Title: Controlled programmed trial of ocimum sanctum leaf on generalized anxiety disorders
    Author(s): D Bhattacharyya, TK Sur, U Jana, and PK Debnath
    Institution(s): Department of Pharmacology, Dr. B.C. Roy Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research and Departmen of Kayachikitsa, JB Roy State Ayurvedic Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, India
    Publication: Nepal Med Coll J
    Date: 2008
    Abstract: Ocimum sanctum, an Indian medicinal plant, has been on trial for its role in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in hospital based clinical set-up. Hamilton’s brief psychiatric rating scale (BPRS) and thorough clinical investigations were used to screen the subjects. Thirty-five subjects (21 male and 14 female; average age 38.4 years) were medicated with the plant extract in a fixed dose regime (500 mg/capsule, twice daily p.o. after meal). They were thoroughly investigated clinically and using standard questionnaires based on different psychological rating scale at baseline (day 0), mid-term (day 30) and final (day 60). The observations exhibited that, O. sanctum significantly (p<0.001) attenuated generalized anxiety disorders and also attenuated its correlated stress and depression. It further significantly (p<0.001) improved the willingness to adjustment and attention in human. Therefore, it may be concluded that O. sanctum may be useful in the treatment of GAD in human and may be a promising anxiolytic agent in near future.
    Link: Source
    Citations:

  4. Study Type: Human Study, Clinical Case Report
    Title: Comparative evaluation of clinical effects of simultaneous ultrasonic scaling and irrigation with medicated water containing 2% Occimum sanctum on gingivitisA Clinical Intervention Study
    Author(s): Deepti Gattani, Saurabh Lingala, Grishmi Niswade, Jigyasa Sahu, Nupur Kar
    Institution(s): Department of Periodontology, Swargiya Dadasaheb Kalmegh Smruti Dental College and Hospital, Nagpur
    Publication: Journal of Advanced Medical and Dental Sciences Research
    Date: June 2019
    Abstract: Background-Antimicrobial therapy is considered essential as an adjunct to mechanical therapy for periodontal disease. To compare and evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasonic scaling and irrigation with2%Occimum sanctum extract, 0.2% chlorhexidine and distilled water in patients with chronic gingivitis. Methods-A sample size of 45 subjects in the age group of 20 – 65 years were randomly allocated via simple random sampling technique into three groups. Group A - Ultrasonic scaling using medicated water containing extract of 2% occimum sanctum. (test group), Group B – Ultrasonic scaling using 0.2% chlorhexidine (test group) and Group C – Ultrasonic scaling using Distilled water(control group). The Gingival Index, Plaque Index and Sulcular Bleeding Index were obtained at baseline, 7 days and 21 days. Results- Intra-group comparison shows significant reduction in the Plaque score for all the groups while intergroup comparison did not show any significant difference in group A and B. Intragroup comparison shows significant reduction in the Sulcular Bleeding Score for all the groups while intergroup comparison did not show any significant difference in group A and B. Intragroup comparison shows significant reduction in the Gingival score for all the groups while intergroup comparison did not show any significant difference in group A and B. Gingival inflammation was also significantly reduced in both group A and B when individually compared with group C. (p value <0.05). Conclusion-The results of the study has shown that ultrasonic scaling and irrigation with Tulsi extract has better effect on plaque control and gingival health and is at par with the gold standard of chlorhexidine.
    Link: Source
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  5. Study Type: Animal Study, Commentary, Human Study: In Vitro - In Vivo - In Silico, Human: Case Report, Meta Analysis, Review
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