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Aloe arborescens

Aloe arborescens, also called Candelabra aloe or krantz aloe, is a large, multi-headed, sprawling succulent—related to Aloe Vera—that can sometimes reaches tree size.[1]

In Japan it is referred to as Kidachi-aloe.[2]

Healing Properties

Antiglycation

Alow arborescens extracts have demonstrated significant inhibition of glycation and free-radical persistence, without any cytotoxic activity.[3]

Antiinflammatory

Chemoprotective

Disease / Symptom Treatment

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  1. Study Type: Animal Study
    Title: Administration of a Nutraceutical Mixture Composed by Aloe arborescens, Annona muricata, Morinda citrifolia, Beta rubra, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Vaccinium myrtillus Reduces Doxorubicin-Induced Side Effects
    Author(s): Natasha Irrera, Giovanni Pallio, Federica Mannino, Rosario Gugliotta, Daniela Metro, Domenica Altavilla, and Francesco Squadrito
    Institution(s): Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, c/o AOU Policlinico G. Martino, Gazzi, Messina, Italy; Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphological and Functional Sciences, University of Messina, c/o AOU Policlinico G. Martino, Gazzi, Messina, Italy
    Publication: Nutrition and Cancer
    Date: May 2019
    Abstract: The antibiotic doxorubicin is often used as an anti-neoplastic drug; however, many patients showed very unpleasant side-effects. Previous studies have demonstrated that dietary substances such as Aloe arborescens, Annona muricata, Morinda citrifolia, Beta rubra, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Vaccinium myrtillus may have anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative, and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of a mixture of these components in an experimental model of doxorubicin toxicity. Rats (n = 30) received doxorubicin (5 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks and were randomized to receive the dietary mixture 2 hours following the first doxorubicin injection and until the end of the experiment. Animals were killed following 4 weeks, and blood, liver, and heart were collected for further analysis. The dietary supplement improved the depressed body weight and food consumption induced by DOX. In addition, the nutraceutical mixture reduced oxidative stress, ameliorated the morphological score, and preserved liver and heart structure, demonstrating a protective effect. These data show for the first time that the mixture of Aloe arborescens, Annona muricata, Morinda citrifolia, Beta rubra, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Vaccinium myrtillus may be useful to reduce the side effects following treatment with doxorubicin, and might ameliorate the quality of life of patients following chemotherapy.
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  2. Study Type: Human Study: In Vitro
    Title: Anti-inflammatory Active Constituents of Aloe arborescens Miller
    Author(s): Masatoshi YAMAMOTO, Toshio MASUI, Kiyoshi SUOIYAMA, Masami YOKOTA, Kazuya NAKAGOMI, Hiroyuki NAKAZAWA
    Institution(s): Shizuoka Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environmental Science; School of Pharmaceutical Science, University of Shizuoka; Fermentation Research Institute; The National Institute of Public Health
    Publication: Agricultural and Biological Chemistry
    Date: July 1990
    Abstract: Aloe arborescens Miller (Aloe; "Kidachi-aroe" in Japanese) has been widely used as a folk remedy for constipation, bites, burns, etc. in Japan. 1.2) Many Aloe leaf (800g) 1627 constituents have been isolated from Aloe,3.4) but no one has correlated the constituents to an anti-inflammatory activity. We have previously reported5) that the major constituents of Aloe, barbaloin and aloenin, showed inhibitory effects on rat mast cell degranulation. This report describes the inhibitory effects of the constituents of Aloe, including barbaloin and aloenin, on carrageenan-induced rat-paw inflammatory edema.
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  3. Study Type: Animal Study: In Vitro
    Title: Antiglycation Activity and HT-29 Cellular Uptake of Aloe-Emodin, Aloin, and Aloe arborescens Leaf Extracts
    Author(s): Guglielmina Froldi, Federica Baronchelli, Elisa Marin, and Margherita Grison
    Institution(s): Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy
    Publication: Molecules
    Date: June 2019
    Abstract: Aloe arborescens is a relevant species largely used in traditional medicine of several countries. In particular, the decoction of leaves is prepared for various medicinal purposes including antidiabetic care. The aim of this research was the study of the antiglycation activity of two A. arborescens leaf extracts and isolated compounds: aloin and aloe-emodin. These phytoconstituents were quantitatively assessed in methanolic and hydroalcoholic extracts using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. In addition, the total phenolic and flavonoid contents were detected. In order to study their potential use in diabetic conditions, the antiglycation and antiradical properties of the two extracts and aloin and aloe-emodin were investigated by means of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH) assays; further, their cytotoxicity in HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells was evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Furthermore, the ability of aloin and aloe-emodin to permeate the cellular membranes of HT-29 cells was determined in order to estimate their potential in vivo absorption. This assessment indicated that aloe-emodin can substantially pass through cell membranes (~20%), whereas aloin did not permeate into HT-29 cells. Overall, the data show that both the methanolic and the hydroalcoholic A. arborescens extracts determine significant inhibition of glycation and free-radical persistence, without any cytotoxic activity. The data also show that the antiglycation and the antiradical activities of aloin and aloe-emodin are lower than those of the two extracts. In relation to the permeability study, only aloe-emodin is able to cross HT-29 cellular membranes, showing the attitude to pass through the intestinal layer. Overall, the present data surely support the traditional use of A. arborescens leaf extracts against hyperglycemic conditions, while aloin and aloe-emodin as potential drugs need further study
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